Cats and crickets: Testing the naivety of reintroduced Cheetahs to predatory cues

Cats and crickets: Testing the naivety of reintroduced Cheetahs to predatory cues

As wildlife numbers decline, it is becoming an increasingly popular theory that it is viable to reintroduce once captive individuals back into the wild. However, reintroductions may fail as newly introduced animals could be naïve to the threats around them.

Mar 7, 2022
Dinokeng’s Cheetahs: A conservation success story Part Two

Dinokeng’s Cheetahs: A conservation success story Part Two

The second instalment of our wildly popular Dinokeng's Cheetah: A conservation success story

Jul 5, 2021
Dinokeng’s Cheetahs: A conservation success story Part One

Dinokeng’s Cheetahs: A conservation success story Part One

Although Dinokeng Game Reserve management has reintroduced several historically occurring large mammals, its Cheetah reintroduction has been particularly successful. This must-tell story documents Dinokeng’s contribution to the conservation of Africa’s most endangered cat species.

Jun 30, 2021
Science Snippets: Successfully rearing orphaned cheetah in their natural habitat

Science Snippets: Successfully rearing orphaned cheetah in their natural habitat

It is generally understood that our knowledge of the status and trends in African Lion (Panthera leo) numbers is relatively poor, and the collective ability of governments and the wider conservation community to identify priorities or to assess the impacts of interventions, is limited.

Feb 25, 2021
Winning the race against extinction

Winning the race against extinction

We were pleased to be part of a very special evening on 4 December 2019, aimed at celebrating International Cheetah Day, which takes place each year on that date, where we showcased the work being done by the EWT’s Cheetah Conservation Project. This event was generously hosted by PwC South Africa, one of the primary sponsors of this work.

Dec 13, 2019
Wheels on the ground and wings in the air

Wheels on the ground and wings in the air

The EWT’s on-the-ground work takes place across southern and East Africa, often in remote and far-flung places, where conservation action is needed most. This means that our team members must travel great distances to save species and habitats, and work with communities that rely on natural resources to survive. This would not be possible without the support of two of our most generous donors.

Sep 27, 2019